Literacy in the Content Areas

Content literacy is defined as the ability to use reading, writing, talking, listening and viewing as processes to learn subject matter across the curriculum. Based on the recognition that (a) there are multiple literacies, and (b) literacy encompasses the media and processes through which students acquire and demonstrate all knowledge, we understand that “teaching reading and writing” should not be delegated solely to English courses. Teaching the processes of learning must be integrated with teaching of the subject matter. Thus, every teacher—even science and math faculty —must come to view themselves as a teacher of writing and reading. Because most subject experts were not trained to explicitly teach literacy skills, this often requires a shift in attitudes and a commitment to equip subject faculty. Many institutions provide training and support to establish common language or approaches for teaching literacy in the content areas.Evidence Base for Literacy in the Content Areas :

Evidence Base for Literacy in the Content Areas
Articles and Websites

This online inventory of publications in post-secondary composition, rhetoric, technical writing, ESL, and discourse studies is searchable.  See especially Comp Links for additional web resources and tools: http://comppile.org/search/comppile_main_search.php

The WAC Clearinghouse, in partnership with the International Network of Writing Across the Curriculum Programs, publishes journals, books, and other resources for teachers who use writing in their courses.  See http://wac.colostate.edu/index.cfm.

Books
Barton, Mary Lee and C. Heidema. (2002) Teaching Reading in Mathematics, 2nd Edition: a Supplement to Teaching Reading in the Content Areas. Aurora, CO: McREL.

Barton, Mary Lee and D. Jordan. (2001) Teaching Reading in Science: a Supplement to Teaching Reading in the Content Areas. Aurora, CO: McREL.

Billmeyer, Rachel and M.L. Barton. (1998) Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: If Not Me, Then Who?, 2nd Edition. Aurora, CO: McREL.

Doty, Jane K. et.al. (2003) Teaching Reading in Social Studies: a Supplement to Teaching Reading in the Content Areas Teacher’s Manual (2nd Edition). Aurora CO: McREL

Fisher, D. et.al. (2010) 50 Instructional Routines to Develop Content Literacy, 2nd Edition). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon Publishing.

Gee, James Paul. (2010) An Introduction to Discourse Analysis: Theory and Method, 3rd edition. New York: Routledge.

Gee, James Paul. (2010) How to do Discourse Analysis. New York: Routledge.

Gee, James Paul. (2010) New Digital Media and Learning as an Emerging Area and “Worked Examples” as One Way Forward (The John D. and Catherine T.
MacArthur … on Digital Media and Learning). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Poe, Mya, Lerner, N. and Craig, J. (2010). Learning to Communicate in Science and Engineering: Case Studies from MIT. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Tovani, Chris (2004). Do I Really Have to Teach Reading? Content Comprehension, Grades 6-12. Portland, ME: Stenhouse Publishers Inc.

Urquhart, Vicki. and M. McIver (2005). Teaching Writing in the Content Areas. Aurora, CO: McRel and Alexandria VA: ASCD.

Vacca, Richard and JoAnne (2010). Content Area Reading; Literacy and Learning Across the Curriculum (10th Edition). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon Publishing.

Wilhelm, Jeffrey. (2007) Engaging Readers & Writers with Inquiry (Theory and Practice)New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.